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3rd Gen Firebird – Removing the body panels

Whether you want to turn your third gen Firebird into a full KITT replica or just take some body panels off to repair or replace them, it’s always good to know how to proceed and go about that.
Well, since I am pretty particular about the appearance of my KITT and the level of quality that had to go into ‘him’ in the process of restoration, I took off the hood (bonnet in Queen’s english), the fenders, the front and rear bumper, as well as the mirror. None of these parts are particularely difficult to remove, at least not if you do it in the order I did and already removed the inside plastics. I’m saying that because the removal of the rear bumper just takes a bit of time. Why? Well I’m not gonna tell you just like that, I want you to watch the video, of course. 🙂

3rd Gen Firebird & Camaro – Gutting the interior – Part 2

Here we go! After I went through how to remove the seats, seatbelts and interior plastics in Part 1 back in June, it’s now time to show you how to gut the rest of the interior, namely the steering wheel, the dashpad, the gauge cluster, the center console, as well as the carpets.

That’s about as far as most people will have to go if your car is not damaged in a certain way that you might have to go any further. Anyway, if you clear all of that stuff out of your way you can take care of the inner foundations of your third gen F-Body. For my Firebird that meant: sound deadening, new speakers, new carpets, new seat belts, painting the plastics tan and having the seats, door panels and headliner reupholstered and in some cases strenghtened. But that will come in a few later episodes. Enjoy this part for now! 🙂

Pontiac Firebird Trans Am – Knight Rider KITT – Full restoration

This is a video I’ve been wanting to do since I first drove KITT home. I’m compressing the entire (almost) restoration and conversion of my Pontiac Firebird Trans Am KITT in one video. I say almost because this isn’t the of it. I’m still working on mechanic and appearance improvements. This way, it will give you an idea of the extent of work and the amount of video footage that’s gone into restoring this car and transforming it into my own KITT.

After this video, I plan on continuing publishing the countless videos on the restoration process, as well as including visits to car shows, driving sequences and just fun stuff. Hope you enjoy it! 🙂

1’000 subscribers! Thank YOU!!

You made it possible!

So my MotorScotti YouTube channel just reached 1’000 subscribers! What I started with a fairly modest short clip of my Yamaha XVS Drag Star 1100 motorcycles has gone through being a model car review channel to becoming a DIY how to repair and modification channel about cars in general and mores specifically the Peugeot RCZ. As mention in my channel update video, it’s time to move on to the next chapter with the Pontiac Firebird KITT project.

Over the years I have received a loads of constructive and positive feedback from all of the viewers and I am really greatful for your support! I enjoy documenting my little automotive and mechanical projects and share it with the world to help others who are looking for the information I provide and simply show that with a little bit of dedication you can do it, too! At you own risk, of course!! :-p

Anyway, this is just the beginning of a lot more to come. Thank you for your continuous support and stay tuned!! 🙂

 

How to do an oil & oil filter change – Yamaha XVS 1100 Drag Star

Let’s get dirty

In terms of doing an oil change, the Yamaha 1100 Drag Star is probably the least Japanese on planet Earth. Why, simply because you need to remove the exhaust to access the oil filter… I mean, you could simply not bother about the filter and just change the oil – job done. Except that’s not my style. If I’m going to do it myself, I’m gonna do it as good as possible.

Buckle up, here’s how to do it! 🙂

Changing the spark splugs – Yamaha XVS 1100 Drag Star

It’s electrifying

After changing the air filter, the next step would be to put new spark plugs in this ride. Spark plugs are usually changed once the respective mileage prescribed by the manufacturer is over. On my Drag Star, I change them every 10’000 km. I use the original NGK BPR7ES units. The procedure is pretty straightforward.

Here’s how to do it! 🙂

Air filter change – Yamaha XVS 1100 Drag Star Classic

Fresh air instead of oil

Okay, the air filter is part of the expendable materials on a motorcycles. Now that I’m servicing my car, I figured I’d go down the same road as on my Peugeot RCZ and replace the old standard air filter with a K&N sports air filter. It does fit in the original compartment, hopefully make it sound a bit better and last ‘a lifetime’.

The old filter was literally covered in engine oil, which as far as I know, can only mean that there is too much oil in the engine! Perfect time to get that cleaned up, changed and obviously also conduct an oil change..!

Here’s how to do it! 🙂

Installing a FOX sports exhaust – Peugeot RCZ

The first really significant modification to my RCZ

Enough of the routine maintenance, let’s get some excitement into this ride. The K&N air filter was a good start, but why not upgrade the RCZ esthetically while also improving the sound note?! I decided to install a FOX dual exhaust for three reasons: It looks great – chrome, classy and bigger than the stock exhaust – hopefully sounds great and it’s road legal in Switzerland. Furthermore, I went all in and also acquired a matching sporty rear diffusor that allows the new right side exhaust to come out.

NOTICE: The installation is quite straightforward. As always, take some time to prepare yourself and don’t rush the whole disassembling an reassembling. The kit was complete. You don’t need to cut or weld anything to the chassis. However, you need to cut the stock exhaust pipe at the exact spot, in order for the new pipe to fit. More tips are given at the end of part 2.

Here’s how it’s done! 🙂

Part 1 – Removing the original exhaust and prefitting the FOX exhaust

Part 2 – Final assembly, sound check and feedback

Resetting the service warning message – Peugeot RCZ

Keep your computer up to date!

So you’re one of those people who service and tune up your car yourself, right? But what about all the electronic little messages that come up periodically and want to remind you to look after your car? Of course, YOU wouldn’t need that because YOU keep track of your car’s maintenance history, right? Well guess what, you still need to tell you car when you changed the oil. My RCZ‘s onboard computer wants me to service my car every 30’000 km. It shows so buy putting up a little wrench next to the odometer, as well as in the central display between the rpm gauge and the speedometer.

Lucky you, you drive a Peugeot and hence don’t need any diagnostic computer to reset the service warning message!

Here’s how to do it! 🙂

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